Monday Inspiration

12 Mar

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Bite Sized Technology

12 Mar

Bite Sized Technology

Where else but Montreal!

NYC vs Montreal Bagel Compared

7 Feb

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thatchers3

7 Feb

 

thatchers3

Cool coffee shops are a dime a dozen, but finding a place that’s designed with function, sustainability and ambiance in mind? Not so easy. Vancouver-based Thatcher’s Coffee takes sustainably-designed interior spaces up a notch. Spotted over at Design Sponge, the beautifully furnished shop boasts chairs upholstered in coffee sacks, planters made from recycled coffee cans, and lights constructed from coffee pots — details that ensure patrons would be hard-pressed to lose sight of the life cycle of the cup of brew sitting before them.

Read more: Thatcher’s Coffee Shop Showcases Recycled Design | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

 

No More Résumés, Say Some Firms

31 Jan

Union Square Ventures recently posted an opening for an investment analyst.

Instead of asking for résumés, the New York venture-capital firm—which has invested in Twitter, Foursquare, Zynga and other technology companies—asked applicants to send links representing their “Web presence,” such as a Twitter account or Tumblr blog. Applicants also had to submit short videos demonstrating their interest in the position.

Union Square says its process nets better-quality candidates —especially for a venture-capital operation that invests heavily in the Internet and social-media—and the firm plans to use it going forward to fill analyst positions and other jobs.

Companies are increasingly relying on social networks such as LinkedIn, video profiles and online quizzes to gauge candidates’ suitability for a job. While most still request a résumé as part of the application package, some are bypassing the staid requirement altogether.

A résumé doesn’t provide much depth about a candidate, says Christina Cacioppo, an associate at Union Square Ventures who blogs about the hiring process on the company’s website and was herself hired after she compiled a profile comprising her personal blog, Twitter feed, LinkedIn profile, and links to social-media sites Delicious and Dopplr, which showed places where she had traveled.

StickerGiant’s John Fischer, right, and interviewee Adam Thackeray shoot a video Monday.
“We are most interested in what people are like, what they are like to work with, how they think,” she says.

John Fischer, founder and owner of StickerGiant.com, a Hygiene, Colo., company that makes bumper and marketing stickers, says a résumé isn’t the best way to determine whether a potential employee will be a good social fit for the company. Instead, his firm uses an online survey to help screen applicants.

Questions are tailored to the position. A current opening for an Adobe Illustrator expert asks applicants about their skills, but also asks questions such as “What is your ideal dream job?” and “What is the best job you’ve ever had?” Applicants have the option to attach a résumé, but it isn’t required. Mr. Fischer says he started using online questionnaires several years ago, after receiving too many résumés from candidates who had no qualifications or interest. Having applicants fill out surveys is a “self-filter,” he says.

A previous posting for an Internet marketing position had applicants rate their marketing and social-media skills on a scale of one to 10 and select from a list of words how friends or co-workers would describe them. Options included: high energy, type-A, laid back, perfect, creative or fun.

In times of high unemployment, bypassing résumés can also help companies winnow out candidates from a broader labor pool.

IGN Entertainment Inc., a gaming and media firm, launched a program dubbed Code Foo, in which it taught programming skills to passionate gamers with little experience, paying participants while they learned. Instead of asking for résumés, the firm posted a series of challenges on its website aimed at gauging candidates’ thought processes. (One challenge: Estimate how many pennies lined side by side would span the Golden Gate Bridge.)

It also asked candidates to submit a video demonstrating their love of gaming and the firm’s products.

IGN is a unit of News Corp., which also owns The Wall Street Journal.

Nearly 30 people out of about 100 applicants were picked for the six-week Code Foo program, and six were eventually hired full-time. Several of the hires were nontraditional applicants who didn’t attend college or who had thin work experience.

“If we had just looked at their résumés at the moment we wouldn’t have hired them,” says Greg Silva, IGN’s vice president of people and places. The company does require résumés for its regular job openings.

At most companies, résumés are still the first step of the recruiting process, even at supposedly nontraditional places like Google Inc., which hired about 7,000 people in 2011, after receiving some two million résumés. Google has an army of “hundreds” of recruiters who actually read every one, says Todd Carlisle, the technology firm’s director of staffing.

But Dr. Carlisle says he reads résumés in an unusual way: from the bottom up.

Candidates’ early work experience, hobbies, extracurricular activities or nonprofit involvement—such as painting houses to pay for college or touring with a punk rock band through Europe—often provide insight into how well an applicant would fit into the company culture, Dr. Carlisle says.

Plus, “It’s the first sample of work we have of yours,” he says.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/no-more-r%C3%A9sum%C3%A9s–say-some-firms.html

10 Creative Ways to Use QR Codes for Marketing

20 Jan

http://mashable.com/2012/01/14/qr-code-marketing/

Ekaterina Walter is a social media strategist at Intel. She is a part of Intel’s Social Media Center of Excellence and is responsible for company-wide social media enablement and corporate social networking strategy. She was recently elected to serve on the board of directors of WOMMA.

According to comScore, 20.1 million mobile phone owners in the U.S. used their devices to scan a QR code in the three-month average period ending October 2011. In the big scheme of things, this isn’t a large number. However, the number of people using QR codes is expected to grow.

1. Reinventing the Shopping Experience

Global supermarket giant Tesco solved the problem of enticing hard-working, time-strapped Koreans into its stores by bringing the shopping experience to them, with virtual stores based in subways and metro stations.

Shoppers were encouraged to browse life-like images of

supermarket shelves with their smartphones and scan the QR codes on products to add them to their shopping carts, all whilst waiting for the metro. Their purchases would then be delivered to them at home, with no need to carry heavy bags.

2. Enhancing the User Experience

Some savvy museums and art galleries have been quick to realize the potential in QR codes for enhancing user experiences. Art galleries such as The Cleveland Museum of Art place QR codes next to exhibits to direct visitors to online or audio tours, or to provide more in-depth information.

3. Streamlining the Customer’s Visit

Stores like Starbucks are using QR codes to streamline the way they interact with customers. Rather than waiting in a long line to pay, customers can now integrate their pre-loaded card and their phone app to pay more quickly, as well as learn more about the products and stores.

4. Noting the Things You Enjoy

In a restaurant and enjoying your wine? Rather than scribbling the name of the winery on a napkin, restaurant-goers can now scan QR code wine labels to find out more about the vineyard, the grape, and ordering details.

5. Give Customers Something They Want

Mountain Dew and Taco Bell partnered on a promotion in which customers scanned QR codes on drink cups to get free music downloads. They knew their customers: younger people interested in popular culture. The campaign earned the companies over 200,000 downloads.

6. Providing Real-Time Information

QR codes can take customers to real-time updates anywhere where there is a constant flow of information, for instance, train stations, bus stops, department store sales, live events, restaurant specials or airline booking.

Frankfurt, Germany recently introduced smart posters in train carriages, which provided commuters with travel information, transport connections, special events and points of interest, as well as special offers for travel card holders.

7. Initiate Share-worthy Competitions

Verizon recently ran a successful campaign that increased sales by an incredible 200%. In-store customers scanned a QR code that shared their competition entries on Facebook. If a friend used that link to buy a Verizon mobile, the original customer would win a smartphone. Verizon saw a $35,000 return on a $1,000 investment, plus brand awareness on 25,000 new Facebook profiles.

8. Personalized Gift Giving

This past holiday season, retailer JCPenney allowed customers to add a personal touch to their gifts. When you purchased a gift from any JCPenney store, you received a “Santa Tag” with an accompanying QR code. By scanning the code, the giver could record a personalized voice message for the recipient. The the giver stuck the code on the package like a gift card.

9. Help Your Customers Grow Their Businesses

Google identified over 100,000 businesses in the U.S. as “Favorite Places on Google,” based on Google users’ interactions with local business listings. Each business received a window decal with a unique QR code, which passersby could scan to find information about that business, read reviews, star the business as their favorite and much more.

10. Share Modern Day Mixtapes

If you would like to convey a musical message to your special someone, create a modern day mixtape through Spotify. After creating a special playlist on Spotify, send that special person a greeting card with the QR code, the scan of which leads directly to the mix.

Social Media Week February 13-17, 2012

20 Jan

Social Media week is back! The second week of February is going to awesome with lots of events around DC and the rest of the world. If your company would like to submit an event you have until Jan 31st!

Two Events Sapient is hosting:

Five Ways To Fail In Social Media

Hosted by: Sapient

Category: Advertising & Marketing

Location: Sapient’s Arlington Office

Tuesday, February 14 at 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

In this session, we explore five key failures – with examples – made by new or experienced social media community managers and strategists. What are the biggest failures? What can you do to avoid these failures? We draw upon Sapient’s experience with global for-profit, non-profit and government clients.

6:00pm-6:30pm Registration, Networking, Drinks, etc
6:30pm – 7:30pm Presentation
7:30pm – 8:00pm Additional Networking, Drinks, etc.

Forces of Change: Social Media Past, Present and Future

Hosted by: Sapient

Category: Business & Innovation

Location: Sapient’s Arlington Office

Wednesday, February 15 at 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

We will explore the driving forces that have been evolutionary markers for social media, transitioning it from the past to the present, and giving us a glimpse into the future. This session is for those wishing to understand where their organization is placed on the evolutionary timeline, what is next for social media, and why. In our interactive discussion, we will reminisce about famous flops, share success stories, and discuss the future of what social media can be for Government agencies and Non-governmental organizations.

Light breakfast and coffee will be served.

A few of the events that are hot for the DC market here are:
Protecting the Right to Vote and Empowering Voters Through Collaboration

Social Politics: How Technology Has Helped Campaigns

Politics and technology: the media’s role in the changing landscape

How To Get Your Non-Profit Heard In DC: A SOPA & PIPA Case Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

To check out all the action go to:
http://socialmediaweek.org/schedule/?locale_id=20